'Steel and Glass' by Trevor Christie at Diverse EXTENDED TILL SEPT 10TH

THIS EXHIBITION HAS BEEN EXTENDED UNTIL SEPT 10TH. FOR ANY OF YOU WHO MAY HAVE GONE DOWN LAST SAT. FOR A 10PM CLOSING ONLY TO GET SHUTTERS, APOLOGIES FOR AN EARLIER THAN EXPECTED GALLERY CLOSE THEN. WHILE I AM TOLD A LATER 10PM CLOSE IS CONFIRMED FOR THE FINAL DAY ON THE 10TH, YOU MIGHT STILL BE BEST ADVISED TO RING UP THE GALLERY FIRST ON 0207 733 1488.

We stumbled across a remarkable exhibition of street photography yesterday by Herne Hill resident and photographer, Trevor Christie. Sadly, there are just two days left for this show - it ends Saturday night, September 3rd, at 10pm. But the good news is that you still have time to catch it. Well worth doing so.

Consisting of something like 300 small photo prints (chiefly black and white but also some colour) Christie's work covers four walls of a basement exhibition space at Brixton's Diverse Gallery, 62 Atlantic Road. What's most amazing about it is that to capture his images, Christie reverted to traditional photographic means - none of this is digital. He used a variety of 35mm film stocks to produce negatives and either produced his own prints by hand or had them processed per instruction. It's also nice to find the photographer present at the show, eager to talk about his work and to discuss viewer reaction. Says Trevor, of his decision to go traditional: "References are still required before the image is over, and it's the age of the machines aping objects - for example, a video camera can take stills, record audio, and has a built-in projector. So i want one thing to be there at the start. The image on the negative."

The exhibition is titled 'Steel and Glass' as these represent the main components of the traditional camera - in his case a traditional SLR. As Trevor told us: "The best cameras are older still, yet less 'happy' as they have become older." There's a broad range of subject matter but most of it is urban portraiture which portrays lean, stark and confused times but does so with a sense of wonder. This magically transforms gritty into beauty and lends it a timelessness. Shadows, ghosting and blurring blend reportage with impression - some photos are reminiscent of 40s and 50s urban realism but are layered with an ethereal quality due to imperfection only tactile photography and its processing can bring. Trevor explains: "It's the haunted look. Because there's less optimism in people the older they are? Visually the optimistic ones are less interesting the older they are." The subject matter - chiefly street scenes - and the medium are in ideal balance.

You can see many of the works on show on his Flickr web pages and these include print titles as well as notes (http://www.flickr.com/photos/37663439@N03/) but you'd do so much better seeing these in person to fully appreciate them. Digital doesn't do them justice. There's also a little film of the show up on Youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIgb8RB9STU). The exhibition is open today from 11am-7pm and closes tomorrow at 10pm. Trevor plans to make this a moveable feast and hopes to soon transfer the show to 198 Gallery at Herne Hill and then to The Orange Dot Gallery in Fitzrovia. All of the prints are for sale and he is happy to take orders for alternative print sizes.

This is news but I suppose it is also a review. So I'd better rate it. OK then, 5 stars out of 5. See you down Atlantic Rd.

Comments

before when i was studying abroad in Asia, me and my classmate always come to see these small photo exhibits that displays the real picture of the world, you know poverty, hunger and stuffs.  and seeing these photos brings me back to the memories where people are really fighting for survival to live in a day. lucky for us to have a better life relative to them